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dental-crown-fitting

Dental crowns are amazing things. They are the perfect solution to many dental problems.

Dentists use crowns when someone has a cavity that is too large to be fixed with just a simple filling. Dental crowns can also cover badly stained or discolored teeth. They enable a dentist to reconfigure oddly shaped teeth, and fix badly cracked, chipped or broken teeth. They can reinforce and protect a newly fragile tooth after a root canal.

Crowns are also fitted over dental implant posts to permanently replace one or many missing teeth. Though most of us think of a dental implant as the visible replacement tooth, the posts set below the gum line are the actual implants – crowns are used to cover the implant posts. Crowns are also used to create a stable foundation for dental bridges.

And while the list of uses for these little miracle workers of the dental world is long, all crowns share some common features.

How Do Dental Crowns Work?

A dental crown can be a temporary fix or a permanent one. A temporary crown is typically used during the process of creating and installing a permanent crown or other dental restoration. Permanent crowns are cemented in place, lasting for years, and are meant to be removed only by a dental professional.

Crowns are made of porcelain or ceramic, gold and metal alloys, acrylics and composite resins.

  • Porcelain, fused to an inner metal shell or zirconia, is favored for its strength and natural appearance.
  • Ceramic crowns are not quite as strong as porcelain, but are suitable for some treatment needs and are more affordable than porcelain.
  • Metal alloys - palladium or ickel or chromium base-metal alloys - are generally stronger than porcelain or ceramics. They don’t always look as “real” as ceramic or porcelain crowns, but are far more affordable, so they may be recommended for repairing or replacing back teeth.
  • An all-metal gold alloy crown was once the traditional choice for durability and strength, but they do not look like natural teeth at all and have been largely replaced by ceramic or porcelain. That said, if you appreciate an urban/pirate aesthetic, gold may be exactly what you’re looking for, assuming your dentist agrees.

Depending on where the crown will be placed, the reason for the crown, and the functionality required of the crowned tooth your dentist will recommend the best material/s for your crown.

A dental crown can be a temporary fix or a permanent one. A temporary crown is typically used during the process of creating and installing a permanent crown or other dental restoration. Permanent crowns are cemented in place, last for 7-15 years (and sometimes longer), and are meant to be removed only by a dental professional.

A temporary crown is used only during the process of creating and installing a permanent crown or other restoration. Permanent crowns are cemented in place, and would be removed only by a dental professional

Affordable Dental Crowns

Dental insurance will probably cover part of the cost of a crown, depending on your policy, when you purchased the insurance (new policy owners are typically not covered for more expensive dental treatments such as crowns for six months or longer), whether the crown is addressing a pre-existing condition (restoration of teeth that were missing prior to your purchasing a policy are rarely, if ever, covered by insurance) and whether you have reached your deductible or annual coverage cap for the year.

The annual coverage limit can create a real problem. Dental insurance typically caps coverage at $1,000-$1,500 a year. One crown can wipe out your dental coverage for that year, and if you’ve already spent part of your dental allowance you’ll have to pay out of pocket for your crowns.

Dental savings plans, an alternative to traditional dental insurance, offer plan members savings of 10%-60% on a wide variety of dental treatments – including crowns – from a nationwide network of dentists. Unlike insurance, dental savings plans don’t impose annual spending limits or restrictions for getting care for pre-existing conditions.

Dental savings plans can typically be used within 72 hours of joining the plan (often 24 hours), and there are no waiting periods before you can get care. You can use your savings plan to reduce the cost of dental crowns as soon as your plan is activated.

To find out more about dental plans, visit dentalplans.com. The site’s search tools enable you to easily compare plans by dental procedure, dentist location, and price. Dentalplans.com makes it easy to find the right dental plan for your needs and budget.

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